Questions to ask when scheduling a hearing aid appointment

  1. How long is the wait for an appointment?[LEARN MORE]
  2. What information do I need to bring with me to the appointment? [LEARN MORE]
  3. What can I expect at the appointment? Approximately how long will it take?
  4. Who should receive a copy of my child’s hearing aid report? [LEARN MORE]
  5. Do you provide loaner hearing aids? [LEARN MORE]
  6. Is there any financial assistance available for hearing aids? [LEARN MORE]
  7. What tests will the audiologist do to be sure that the hearing aids are properly programmed? [LEARN MORE]

Keep in mind:
  • When a hearing loss is diagnosed, the goal is to fit hearing aids within 1 month.
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Keep in mind:
  • Bring a copy of the diagnostic hearing test results.
  • Medical clearance for hearing aids is required for children under 18 years of age.
    • Bring a written clearance from your child’s doctor that states that your child can use hearing aids.
  • Come prepared with a list of questions to help you remember what you want to ask.
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Keep in mind:
  • There are other people who may need to receive your child’s hearing aid fitting report:
    • your child’s doctor (to know about the management of your child’s hearing loss)
    • the state newborn hearing screening program (to know that your child received services)
    • your child’s early intervention providers (to help them with the intervention plan)
    • if your child is school-age, your child’s school.
    • You may need to sign a release form so that your information can be shared.
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Keep in mind:
  • Your child needs to hear sounds all the time he or she is awake.
  • Like all equipment, hearing aids malfunction and need repair.
  • Your child needs loaner hearing aids anytime his or her own hearing aids need to be sent to the manufacturer for repair.
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Keep in mind:
  • Financial assistance works differently in different states:
    • Some states have laws that make insurance companies pay for hearing aids for children.
    • Some state EI (early intervention) programs pay for hearing aids, earmolds, and hearing aid supplies, such as batteries.
    • Some states have programs to provide donated hearing aids.
    • Some insurance companies offer hearing aid benefits.
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Keep in mind:
  • The audiologist uses special equipment to adjust the hearing aids to make sure speech sounds can be heard and that loud sounds are not too loud.
  • To set the hearing aids the audiologist will need:
    • your child’s hearing test results
    • to run a special test called the RECD (or real-ear-to-coupler-difference). This involves placing a small, thin tube into your child’s ear canal with the earmolds on. Knowing the RECD and your child’s hearing test results will help the audiologist set the hearing aids correctly.
    • recheck the RECD every time your child gets new earmolds. As your child grows, the hearing aid settings will need to be adjusted.
  • Always ask for a copy of your child’s test results. This is helpful information for you and your child’s intervention team.
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